The Annual International Berkeley Undergraduate Prize for Architectural Design Excellence 2022
Berkeley Prize 2022

To Enter

(The following are the guidelines for the now completed BP2021 Community Service Fellowship proposals and projects.  They are presented here to give you a broad sense of what will be required for BP2022.  Specific requirements that might differ somewhat from the below will be posted when the BP2022 Fellowship competition launches in early in 2022.)

Here are the ground rules:

The purpose of your Community Service project is to further your understanding of the social art of architecture by allowing you to implement some aspect of this year's topic you have identified in your Berkeley Prize Essay competition proposal.

Your proposal should be for one of the following two options:

  1. To develop a detailed action plan indicating the specific steps needed to develop a new community service program linked to some aspect of architecture or the built world.
  2. Volunteering with an on-going community service program and/or organization of your choice    linked to architecture or the built world.

In either of the above cases, this Fellowship opportunity is intended to take place in your local community where you must follow all local restrictions then in force in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.  No proposal will be entertained for any work outside of your local community or that would require on-site research outside of your local community.  A limited virtual component that would connect you with any needed resources outside of your community will be considered.

Most importantly, all proposals MUST be realistic and have realizable goals.  We are not asking you to take on the world here; to the contrary, we are asking that you propose something that is doable today using your knowledge base and resources that you believe you can assemble to make the proposal a reality.

 

Submission requirements:

One of two options:

1)  A 1250-word Community Services Fellowship Proposal to include an action plan for the future community services program you hope to develop that includes: the specific steps required, anticipated specific community and governmental outreach, and the anticipated specific staffing and resources that would be required for the program to become a reality.  Your Fellowship proposal should include:

  1. The rationale for the proposal:
  • A description of the “local community.” What is the binding issue that brings these people together?
  • A persuasive argument why this program will benefit the identified community either immediately or in the future, including the details of at least one initial concrete step that you hope to make happen during the Fellowship;
  • An explanation of how the program furthers your Essay proposal; and
  • How this opportunity will benefit your continuing architectural education overall.

(b)  A time-table for the completion of the above work; and

(c)  A budget covering any anticipated expenses.

(d)  You must provide a letter of recommendation from a faculty member in your academic institution who is familiar with your proposal and who will confirm that your proposal is suited to your abilities.

- O R -

2)  A description of the existing program or organization you hope to join as a volunteer and the specific responsibilities you will be expected to fulfill. Your Fellowship proposal should include:

       (a) The rationale for the proposal:

  • A description of the organization or program you have selected;
  • A persuasive argument why this program will benefit your local community either immediately or in the future;
  • An explanation of how the opportunity furthers your Essay proposal; and
  • How this opportunity will benefit your continuing architectural education overall.

(b)  The schedule and overall length of time for your volunteer activities; and

(c)  A budget covering any anticipated expenses.

(d)  Reference to published material regarding the program/organization should be included with your proposal, preferably including a website address that includes the name of a contact person.  If you are selected for the Fellowship, you will be expected to provide a letter from the head of the program/organization formally inviting you to participate.

3)  Prior to receiving any funding, you will be asked to submit an Indemnification form provided by the Berkeley Prize and a letter confirming that you are in adequate health to undertake the work you propose. 

NOTE: The Berkeley Prize is adamant that no student should place themselves in a situation that would unduly expose them to the COVID-19 virus, for instance, volunteering in a health care setting, etc. The Prize Committee will reject any proposals that in the Prize’s estimation indicates that the student is putting themselves in particularly heightened risk.

 

Awards:

1)  The Berkeley Prize will provide a stipend of up to 3750USD for each Community Service Fellowship that is awarded, to be paid in installments during the course of the Fellowship. 

2)  The prize amount will be based on your budget for the project you select, including the hours you anticipate, travel and other incidental costs within your community, costs associated with possibly initiating the first step in a program, etc.

3)  Winning students whose budgets exceed the prize limit will be asked to prove that they have the additional funds needed to fully complete their proposed program.

4)  The award is provisional, based upon your ability to provide the Berkeley Prize Committee with the required details and documents related to your Proposal for your program.

5)  If you volunteer with an existing program/organization, the amount and/or form of the contribution to that organization will be determined on a case-by-case basis by the Prize Committee.

 

Team Submissions:

If you entered the Essay Competition as a team, each member is eligible to apply for the Community Services Fellowship individually.  To do so, the second teammate should create a new account, then notify the administrator at info@berkeleyprize.org in order to be advanced to Semifinalist and allowed to participate.

(NOTE: If you place as a Semifinalist in the BP2022 Essay Competition as part of a two-person team, your Community Fellowship proposals will also require that you proposed project be completed by the same two team members.) 

 


Additional Help and Information

Are you in need of assistance? Please email info@berkeleyprize.org.

Elli Mosayebi, Edelaar Mosayebi Inderbitzin Architects (BP2022 Juror): vacancy – no vacancy project. "Floor Plan." (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Elli Mosayebi, Edelaar Mosayebi Inderbitzin Architects (BP2022 Juror): vacancy - no vacancy project. "Sleep on riposa." (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.) Photo credit: Michael Stirnemann

Elli Mosayebi, Edelaar Mosayebi Inderbitzin Architects (BP2022 Juror): vacancy – no vacancy project. "The two built-in platforms contain numerous storage compartments for personal belongings." (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Elli Mosayebi, Edelaar Mosayebi Inderbitzin Architects (BP2022 Juror): vacancy - no vacancy project. "The Kitchen"  (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Onizuka Crossing Housing, David Baker Architects, San Francisco, 2016. The result of a partnership between MidPen Housing and the City of Sunnyvale, California, U.S.A., Onizuka Crossing provides 58 low-income working families with new, affordable rental homes in Sunnyvale, the heart of the Silicon Valley. Twenty-nine units are reserved for formerly homeless individuals and their families. (See: https://www.dbarchitect.com/project_detail/178/Onizuka%20Crossing%20Family%20Housing.html) Photo credit: ©Bruce Damonte.from DBArchitect.com.

Onizuka Crossing Housing, David Baker Architects, 2016. "Former homeless residents receive extensive supportive services in collaboration with the Santa Clara County Department of Behavioral Health and the U.S. Veterans Administration Palo Alto Healthcare System... Onizuka Crossing is a prime example of infill development, transforming a U.S. National Guard armory building into supportive, permanent affordable housing." (See: https://www.dbarchitect.com/project_detail/178/Onizuka%20Crossing%20Family%20Housing.html) Photo credit: ©Bruce Damonte from DBArchitect.com.

Aleksis Bertoni, Architect, Type Five (BP2022 Juror): Flexible housing adpated over time. Isometric interior perspective of one example. (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Aleksis Bertoni, Architect, Type Five (BP2022 Juror). Flexible housing adapted over time.  Kitchen rendering of one example.  (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Aleksis Bertoni, Architect, Type Five (BP2022 Juror): Flexible housing adpated over time. Isometric interior perspective of one example. (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Aleksis Bertoni, Architect, Type Five (BP2022 Juror). Flexible housing adapted over time.  Bedroom rendering of one example.  (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

S. Tetteh + Associates Architects, Accra, Ghana. Low-cost housing project for rangers and conservation staff at the Bia and Ankasa Reserves, Juabeso-Bia district, southwest Ghana.

S. Tetteh + Associates Architects, Accra, Ghana. Low-cost housing project for rangers and conservation staff at the Bia and Ankasa Reserves, Juabeso-Bia district, southwest Ghana.

Fondazione Housing Sociale, Milan, Italy: The Housing Foundation developed a class to help future residents form a collaborative community in their housing development. Research by Dorit Fromm, Writer, Architect, BP2022 Juror: (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

From the manual "Starting Up Communities, A Design Kit for Collaborative Housing," Fondazione Housing Sociale, Milan, Italy.  Research by Dorit Fromm, Author, Architect, BP2022 Juror: (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Mehr als Wohnen, Switzerland: A plaza allows neighbors to mingle and is open to the larger neighborhood. Research by Dorit Fromm, Author, Architect, BP2022 Juror: (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Mehr als Wohnen, Switzerland: Childcare and afterschool care are located on the ground floor level of the housing, as well as a café and other neighborhood services. Research by Dorit Fromm, Author, Architect, BP2022 Juror: (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Samanbahce, Nicosia, North Cyprus.  A mid-20th century social housing experiment. Drone-view. (See: https://www.designboom.com/architecture/alp-galip-captures-cyprus-first-social-housing-complex-samanbahce-07-17-2021)   (Photo by Alp Galip for Designboom.com)

Augustine Owusu-Ansah, S. Tetteh + Associates Architects (BP2022 Juror): Shelter Afrique's 5000 for 5000 Affordable Housing Competition winning entry. (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Augustine Owusu-Ansah, S. Tetteh + Associates Architects (BP2022 Juror): Shelter Afrique's 5000 for 5000 Affordable Housing Competition winning entry.  (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Augustine Owusu-Ansah, S. Tetteh + Associates Architects (BP2022 Juror): Shelter Afrique's 5000 for 5000 Affordable Housing Competition winning entry.  (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Augustine Owusu-Ansah, S. Tetteh + Associates Architects (BP2022 Juror): Shelter Afrique's 5000 for 5000 Affordable Housing Competition winning entry.  (See Essay Question: Introductions by jurors.)

Williams Terrace, Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A., Architect of Record, McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture, Spartanburg, South Carolina, U.S.A. /Design Architect, David Baker Architect, San Francisco, California, U.S.A., 2017. "Williams Terrace won the 2019 American Institute of Architects/Housing and Urban Development Secretary's Housing and Community Design Award for Excellence in Affordable Housing Design. This singular nation-wide award recognizes architecture that demonstrates overall excellence in terms of design in response to both the needs and constraints of affordable housing... Wide porches that double as circulation offer places to sit, meet in passing, and personalize a bit of outdoor space." (See: https://www.dbarchitect.com/project_detail/176/Williams%20Terrace%20.html) Photo credit: Chris Luker from DBArchitect.com.

Williams Terrace, Charleston, South Carolina, U.S.A., Architect of Record, McMillan Pazdan Smith Architecture, Spartanburg, South Carolina, U.S.A. /Design Architect, David Baker Architect, San Francisco, California, U.S.A., 2017. "The design team worked closely with the Housing Authority of the City of Charleston to create a dynamic building that meets the challenges of the site—located in a high-velocity flood zone—and respects the gracious built fabric of downtown historic Charleston... Apartments connect to the wide circulation porches, which have room for some personal touches." (See: https://www.dbarchitect.com/project_detail/176/Williams%20Terrace%20.html) Photo credit: Chris Luker from DBArchitect.com.

Vindmøllebakken, 40-unit cohousing project, Stavanger, Norway, 2019. Designed by founding architects Siv Helene Stangeland and Reinhard Kropf of Norwegian firm Helen & Hard. The architects now live in Vindmøllebakken. Photo credit: Minna Soujoki Langbord/Courtesy of Helen & Hard via Editon.CNN.com

Vindmøllebakken, 40-unit cohousing project, Stavanger, Norway, 2019. In addition to Vindmøllebakken (see previous slide), Helen & Hard are reported to having five other cohousing projects in the works. Photo credit: Sindre Ellingsen/Courtesy of Helen & Hard via Edition.CNN.com

Easter Hill Village, Richmond, U.S.A., 1954. Demolished, 2004. "It was the most significant public effort to provide affordable permanent housing for many families displaced by demolition of temporary World War II housing. It was the first multi-unit residential development to combine the twin themes of the planned unit development with the individuation of units... and the care given to integrating a multi-unit residential development to its site." Historic American Buildings Survey, Library of Congress, U.S.A. (See: https://www.loc.gov/item/ca3350/)

Richmond Village (formerly Easter Hill Village - see previous slide), California, U.S.A., 2008. "The goal for the …Richmond Village project was to turn 300 units of crime-ridden, run-down public housing into a vital neighborhood anchored by a community center and public open space. The development was originally built in 1954 and was a model of public housing until neglect, crime and poverty took over. The Richmond Housing Authority together with Richmond Village…residents collaborated to re-construct a vision of community. The vision included open/community space with mixed-income housing; 100% of the rental housing is affordable, with 70% allocated for public housing residents. The for-sale family homes have a mix of low, moderate and market-rate housing." (See: https://www.nibbi.com/projects/richmond-village/)

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